AGW – Calamity or Strategy?

There are those who believe that ‘global warming’ is a consequence of natural forces, there are those who believe that ‘global warming’ is man-made, and there are some who don’t believe it is happening at all.

Most reputable scientists seem to agree that there was a warming trend noticed in the mid-eighties (when satellite data became ‘de rigueur’) which lasted until 1998. Most would also agree that this warming has plateau’d and that the average global temperature has been steady for the last two decades. Many say that CO2 is to blame, many don’t.

Let’s, for the sake of argument, put all that aside for the moment. It really doesn’t matter, anyhow. What does matter in the AGW (anthropogenic global warming) debate is whether or not there are some people who have been trying to get the earth to warm up. Dane Wiggington is of the opinion that the earth is warming and that the result will be catastrophic. He also believes that geo-engineering is (partly) to blame. The implications are surreal.

There are three reasons for which this scenario is plausible: derivatives; market share; and commodities.

Derivatives (without getting too technical) are insurance. They are side bets made by financiers in order to protect themselves against investments gone bad. A farmers’ crops may be worth a million dollars, but if a natural disaster strikes, the failed crop might be worth two million through the derivatives market. This is the basis for ‘disaster capitalism.’ The derivatives market is said to be worth hundreds of trillions. Profits depend on failures in more traditional enterprises.

Market share is what drives corporations to monopoly. The more market share, the more customers, the more sales. Companies such as Monsanto have been developing techniques which would assure them almost complete market dominance. They, along with their partners, have been researching seed technology which could grow in almost any condition such as drought, flood, and even radiation.

Commodities are everything the world uses. They are raw materials. They are food. They are mineral resources such as gold (debatable,) oil, uranium, and coal. Some say that they are running out, or at least, that the low-hanging fruit has already been picked. There could be a new source of commodities, though. There could be an entire ocean of virgin ground awaiting exploration.

This would satisfy all three conditions.

If the world was warming, the polar ice caps would melt. This would wreak havoc with the global economy and the derivatives market would prove very profitable for the psychopaths praying for (and betting on) plague conditions. Environmental devastation would also prove very profitable for large conglomerates that could supply (very expensive) food which could not be grown anywhere else anymore. Thirdly, if the poles did melt, great swaths of new land would be exposed and exploited immediately.

This doomsday scenario begs the question, are there those who would sabotage the world for their own gain? If history is any indication, the answer is a resounding, “Yes!” If these people do exist, are they presently putting their resources to work in trying to achieve this goal? Is geo-engineering being used to warm the planet further and faster?

Whether or not this is being implemented, the people in Davos have just put together a plan to ensure that whatever happens, they will control the outcome. “Scott Minerd (who before Guggenheim worked at Credit Suisse and Morgan Stanley) …joined a World Economic Forum advisory council. Its task? Develop guidelines for those nations looking to do business at the top of the world. That framework is to be released Thursday, in Davos.”

“The Arctic guidelines are voluntary, like many other sustainable investment initiatives, including the Principles for Responsible Investment or even the WEF’s own work on “sustainable competitiveness.” How does anyone expect to protect the Arctic environment in such a gold rush? The project is designed to complement the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, and while the green earth is littered with do-good business pledges, the notion received a shot in the arm recently. In December, almost 200 nations agreed in Paris to adhere to the first-ever universal climate goals. How nations contribute to progress toward them is their call, since there are no binding demands to cut greenhouse gas emissions.”

The above taken from Bloomberg’s “The World Has Discovered a $1 Trillion Ocean.”

So cui bono? Who are the people who would benefit from a world destroyed, what tools would they employ to see such a strategy implemented, and just how far would they go to dominate and control the earth and its resources?

One would expect to find the answer just north of 66 degrees.

Canada: The Only Safe Place Left?

It would appear that Canada is doing alright. One of the few western nations to have weathered the credit collapse, Canada seems to be doing okay, for now.

The recent drop in the price of oil, however, has hurt and will continue to hurt. Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz patted himself on the back yesterday by saying that it was a good thing that he lowered the rates when he did, rather than wait and see. The effect is to slightly weaken Canadian GDP in Q1, but reduce the long-term sting (assuming oil will rebound this year – a scenario which some consider unlikely.) This continues the storyline that Canada has been conservative in its financial planning and that ‘slow and steady’ wins the race.

Japan, on the other hand, faces many huge problems. An ageing population coupled with a low birth rate, little land for crops, radioactive food on what little land they do have (which will hurt the birth rate more than increase the death rate) and a money-printing strategy of which even the Fed is jealous.

Europe is printing money, Australia’s natural resources are crashing in value, China’s economy (the shadow side of it anyhow) is plummeting, and Russia… it could go either way. The only thing holding up the US economy now, besides hype and faith, is the value of the dollar. (What Saudi did to oil, America did to its currency; but Saudi is hurting, too.) The strong dollar is leaving all other currencies in its wake. Swiss de-pegged the Franc and said enough, we’re not playing this game anymore. (They should have gotten their gold back in that referendum last year, even it if was all in coin bars.)

Let’s not forget that the Canadian economy would be in tatters were it not for the American market. This is Canada’s greatest vulnerability; but Canada has been hedging of late with emphasis on the TPP and other trade deals abroad.

Nevertheless, other factors bring one to conclude that Canada is the place to be. Li Ka-Shing (richest man in Asia) just sold everything he had in Hong-Kong and got himself a Canadian passport. The Rothschilds’ head office is in Toronto (they may or may not still control the world, but they do know what they’re doing.) Things can’t be all bad, can they?

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